Da Treviso The Elder, Girolamo (Attributed to)

Creator

Da Treviso The Elder, Girolamo (Attributed to)
active Treviso, 1455 - 1497
Born in the northern Italian city of Treviso, Girolamo Da Treviso The Elder worked as a painter and sculptor in Bologna, and eventually worked as an engineer for Henry VIII when he was killed by a cannon shot during the Siege of Boulogne in 1544 (which allows for the inference that any works created during his later years were likely commissioned by Henry). Working in Bologna during the 1520s, Girolamo was exposed to Raphael's St. Cecilia. Standing alongside Leonardo and Michelangelo as the third great painter of the High Renaissance was the younger Raphael, who in a short lifespan painted a great number of life-like and engaging portraits. Girolamo’s work in Bologna reveals a bold, highly expressive adaptation of the classical vocabulary of form seen in the late works of Raphael. Stylistically, Girolamo is associated with Giorgionismo and the continuation of Giorgione's style. Giorgionismo is devoid of devotional, allegorical, and historical objective focusing instead on adding character to work using a gradual shading of colors revealing perspective and light - also known as sfumato and chiaroscuro. Furthermore, Giorgione pioneered the practice of using oil paints – the practice which enabled Girolamo to create incredibly detailed and emotionally evocative works within a classical framework. Besides working in Bologna, which included sculptural decoration on the portal of San Petronio and grisaille paintings inside, Girolamo also worked in Genoa, Faenza, Trent, and at the Palazzo del Te in Mantua.

Citation

Da Treviso The Elder, Girolamo (Attributed to), active Treviso, 1455 - 1497, and Born in the northern Italian city of Treviso, Girolamo Da Treviso The Elder worked as a painter and sculptor in Bologna, and eventually worked as an engineer for Henry VIII when he was killed by a cannon shot during the Siege of Boulogne in 1544 (which allows for the inference that any works created during his later years were likely commissioned by Henry). Working in Bologna during the 1520s, Girolamo was exposed to Raphael's St. Cecilia. Standing alongside Leonardo and Michelangelo as the third great painter of the High Renaissance was the younger Raphael, who in a short lifespan painted a great number of life-like and engaging portraits. Girolamo’s work in Bologna reveals a bold, highly expressive adaptation of the classical vocabulary of form seen in the late works of Raphael. Stylistically, Girolamo is associated with Giorgionismo and the continuation of Giorgione's style. Giorgionismo is devoid of devotional, allegorical, and historical objective focusing instead on adding character to work using a gradual shading of colors revealing perspective and light - also known as sfumato and chiaroscuro. Furthermore, Giorgione pioneered the practice of using oil paints – the practice which enabled Girolamo to create incredibly detailed and emotionally evocative works within a classical framework. Besides working in Bologna, which included sculptural decoration on the portal of San Petronio and grisaille paintings inside, Girolamo also worked in Genoa, Faenza, Trent, and at the Palazzo del Te in Mantua., “Da Treviso The Elder, Girolamo (Attributed to),” UCSB ADA Museum Omeka, accessed September 25, 2022, http://art-collections.museum.ucsb.edu/items/show/3189.