BARLOW, Lou

Creator

BARLOW, LOU
b. United States, 1908 -2011
Louis Breslow, also known as Lou Barlow, worked for the Graphics division of the New York City WPA. He studied in Europe and at the National Academy of Design. He belonged to the American Watercolor Society and the Philadelphia Print Club. Many of his WPA prints are in the collection of Fort Sam Houston. Later he became a medical illustrator. To make a wood engraving, the artist cuts into a wood black with metal tools. It is possible to create great detail and texture in this medium. The cut-away areas will remain white, while the raised areas of the block will take the ink. Born in New York City, Barlow graduated from the National Academy of Design in 1930. He worked for the Public Works of Art Project until it was liquidated in 1934, after which he was employed by the Federal Art Project from 1935 until 1941 when he began work as a medical illustrator for the United States Army during the Second World War. After discharge from the army, Barlow began a civilian career as a medical illustrator and, in addition, designed and created prosthetics. Since retirement he has resumed printmaking and, in 1994, was named National Academician in recognition of his long and distinguished professional career. Through a social realist style, Barlow’s printed engravings subtly comment on the socio-political context in which he was living.

Citation

BARLOW, LOU, b. United States, 1908 -2011, and Louis Breslow, also known as Lou Barlow, worked for the Graphics division of the New York City WPA. He studied in Europe and at the National Academy of Design. He belonged to the American Watercolor Society and the Philadelphia Print Club. Many of his WPA prints are in the collection of Fort Sam Houston. Later he became a medical illustrator. To make a wood engraving, the artist cuts into a wood black with metal tools. It is possible to create great detail and texture in this medium. The cut-away areas will remain white, while the raised areas of the block will take the ink. Born in New York City, Barlow graduated from the National Academy of Design in 1930. He worked for the Public Works of Art Project until it was liquidated in 1934, after which he was employed by the Federal Art Project from 1935 until 1941 when he began work as a medical illustrator for the United States Army during the Second World War. After discharge from the army, Barlow began a civilian career as a medical illustrator and, in addition, designed and created prosthetics. Since retirement he has resumed printmaking and, in 1994, was named National Academician in recognition of his long and distinguished professional career. Through a social realist style, Barlow’s printed engravings subtly comment on the socio-political context in which he was living., “BARLOW, Lou,” UCSB ADA Museum Omeka, accessed September 25, 2022, http://art-collections.museum.ucsb.edu/items/show/4670.