German or Flemish

1960.12.jpg

Description

Portrait of a Woman, 16th C.



Oil on panel, 18 7/8 x 15 3/4 x 2 5/8"

German or Flemish oil painting of a fully clothed female clasping her hands in front. Her dress reflects layering of an undergament with outer dress and the wearing of a black hood over a linen undercap. These hoods became more complex and structured over time.

Creator

Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting represents the 16th-century response to Italian Renaissance art in the Low Countries. These artists, who span from the Antwerp Mannerists and Hieronymus Bosch at the start of the 16th century to the late Northern Mannerists such as Hendrik Goltzius and Joachim Wtewael at the end, drew on both the recent innovations of Italian painting and the local traditions of the Early Netherlandish artists. In demand in courts all over Europe for his reliable portraits in a style that combined Netherlandish precision with the lessons of Titian and other Italian painters. A meticulous handling of jewellery and sumptuous fabrics are typical Flemish characteristics sought after by courtly sitters. As Renaissance art styles moved through Northern Europe, they changed and were adapted to local customs. In England and the northern Netherlands the Protestant Reformation brought religious painting almost completely to an end. As in Italy, the decline of feudalism opened the way for the cultural, social, and economic changes associated with the Renaissance in Europe. The golden age of painting in the Netherlands was aided by the wealth of the region at this time as well as the presence of King Philip and the Burgundian court, which allowed court artists to flourish. The influence of art of the Netherlands on the European scene grew significantly at this point, with many of its masters gaining the respect and following of numerous Italian artists. The growth of the status of ‘artist’ in the Netherlands is demonstrated by an increase in artists who sign their name and paint self-portraits. Despite several very talented artists of the Tudor Court in England, portrait painting was slow to spread from the elite.

Identifier

1960.12

Citation

Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting represents the 16th-century response to Italian Renaissance art in the Low Countries. These artists, who span from the Antwerp Mannerists and Hieronymus Bosch at the start of the 16th century to the late Northern Mannerists such as Hendrik Goltzius and Joachim Wtewael at the end, drew on both the recent innovations of Italian painting and the local traditions of the Early Netherlandish artists. In demand in courts all over Europe for his reliable portraits in a style that combined Netherlandish precision with the lessons of Titian and other Italian painters. A meticulous handling of jewellery and sumptuous fabrics are typical Flemish characteristics sought after by courtly sitters. As Renaissance art styles moved through Northern Europe, they changed and were adapted to local customs. In England and the northern Netherlands the Protestant Reformation brought religious painting almost completely to an end. As in Italy, the decline of feudalism opened the way for the cultural, social, and economic changes associated with the Renaissance in Europe. The golden age of painting in the Netherlands was aided by the wealth of the region at this time as well as the presence of King Philip and the Burgundian court, which allowed court artists to flourish. The influence of art of the Netherlands on the European scene grew significantly at this point, with many of its masters gaining the respect and following of numerous Italian artists. The growth of the status of ‘artist’ in the Netherlands is demonstrated by an increase in artists who sign their name and paint self-portraits. Despite several very talented artists of the Tudor Court in England, portrait painting was slow to spread from the elite., “German or Flemish,” UCSB ADA Museum Omeka, accessed October 3, 2022, http://art-collections.museum.ucsb.edu/items/show/671.